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of the president, the precedent that teddy roosevelt established. it's franklin roosevelt and the experience during world war ii that really changes the nature of the office and it's the cold war. the greatest expansion in presidential power throughout our history has taken place during times of war. what happens during the cold war is war is institutionalized. we live in a time of permanent war. it's the president's role as commander in chief that leads to not only the creation of this great apparatus around the executive, but also the expansion of power. this is the one elected person in our constitutional system and during a time of the threat of nuclear war, it's one person who can make decisions. if you're looking at the key turning points, it begins with teddy roosevelt, wilson, franklin roosevelt and then the cold war forges what is now the modern presidency. >> steve, thank you very much. good luck with the special. >> thank you. >>> up next, krystal goes invisible like manti te'o's girlfriend and goes behind enemy lines to give tips or republican as they vf have a strategy session. it was
tradition of the inauguration speech tell that the capital. that was in 1945 when franklin roosevelt was being sworn in for a fourth time. franklin roosevelt, his third inauguration was done at the capitol, but his fourth one was in the middle of world war ii. he felt this was not the inopportune time to have an elaborate inauguration. he decided on his own to move the inauguration to the south front of the capital. the joint committee was not happy with that decision. the president of the united states can decide above and beyond the date and the time everything else is tradition and can be changed. we reverted back to holding inaugurations at the capitol. we moved them from the east front to the west front and the crowd has been getting bigger and bigger. one reason on the west front is that you can accommodate more people. if you look at the photographs of the last several inauguration's, you can measure the crowd by how far it goes back. when ronald reagan was sworn in, the crowds went back to a block beyond the reflecting pool. with each inauguration, at the crowd gets a little
. >> this is from this morning's "washington post." you can draw an analogy to two former president, franklin roosevelt and dwight eisenhower, finding parallels to what fdr delivered in his second address in 1937, and what eisenhower faced in 1957. >> the roosevelt second inaugural address is interesting to read because it really is of a peace with first inaugural. the president said, i came in with a huge crisis, i have been leading this country through, we're on the right path. we are going to keep going. he has a phrase in there -- have we found our happy valley? it was a very fine speech. i would have to go back and look at it again. i do not read it as being an aggressive speak. he was speaking to the whole country, but he was not in campaign mode. roosevelt was very good in that way. of course, eisenhower never sounded like that. >> that speech is recognized as one of the better second inaugurals. i think it does echoes some of the themes of obama, president obama. one of back and look the lines in that speech is, i see a nation ill-clothed -- one-third of the nation. he talked about in
of franklin roosevelt where fdr in 1937 said be proud you're an individual but there's also a collective. and you guys mentioned the word people, how often he said, we, the people. but this is, we, the people almost in a howard zimm people of america kind of way. this was about ordinary people fighting for ordinary rights, stonewall has replaced normandy. you know, selma has replaced iwo jima. there wasn't a marshal tone, this was about inclusion. >> he used the term we, and he used the term common creed over and over again throughout the speech. norah o'donnell was listening to the speech down there on the national mall. nor norah? >> and, scott, on that theme the president used the word together some seven times. a word he used just once in 2009. and i think you're right, this was in some ways a civil rights speech. because the president said, our journey is not complete. that's the message on this martin luther king day. and he said when times change, so must we. so i think all of those things are right. and he said, you know, it's not what binds this nation together is not the color
times since what president? >> franklin roosevelt. >> all right. wins the prize? >> let me give you this. how about this? he is the first president, first democratic president since franklin roosevelt to be elected with more than 50% twice. he is also the first president since dwight eisenhower to be elected twice with more than 51%. >> there you go? >> ranken was above. a mandate. >> a second term. will we see any difference in his second term? what's the second term going to look like? i know you are talking about that with some folks in columbia? >> i will be up at the university of district of columbia with a great event organized by progressive democrats of america, national nurses united, communication workers, a lot of unions bringing together all sorts of folks. keith ellison will be there as well as a lot of other folks talking about this. i think obama can be different. the question is: will he? >> he was showing good signs? >> the transition has been one of the better trigs in modern history. he took on the whole fiscal cliff thing and was strong
wallace, franklin delano roosevelt post of vice president and agriculture commerce secretary. it suggests that america would have been on a very different trajectory had his pass not been blocked in 1944. >> seeing the war clouds gathering on the horizon, roosevelt decided to run for a third term against the strongly anti-war candidate wendell willkie. the stakes were high. the nation would soon be a war. roosevelt weigh the options and chose a controversial secretary of agriculture, henry wallace, as his running mate. wallace had successfully overseen rebuilding after the depression. he had provided food stamps and school lunches. he instituted programs for land use planning and soil conservation. he carved out his credentials in the new year deals as an outspoken anti-fascist. he was considered the scientific community's best ally. he spoke out strongly against the building of a of racial theories in rebuke of the hitler polity -- policy. >> he first introduced me to the mysteries of plant fertilization. i spent a good many years breeding corn because the scientist deepened my appreciat
crowds. but in 1945, franklin roosevelt called off the big party when world war ii was raging. douglas brinkley, historian. >> that was a very unique year and most normal situations even if we're in recession or in a foreign war, we still throw pretty big inaugurals. >> for maurice madden, it is mainly a big moment. >> i do believe that if i'm blessed to live to be an old man, i'll be able to look back on all of this and say i know that i was, you know, a part of american history and that really means a lot to me. >> a big part of his american journey. tom foreman, cnn, washington. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. [ male announcer ] can a car be built around a state of mind? ♪ announcing the all-new 2013 malibu from chevrolet. ♪ with a remarkable new interior featuring the available chevrolet mylin
. >> steve: let's start with the first one you have noted for us, involves franklin delano roosevelt. >> let's listen. >> my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into-- >> and that's interesting, because there was 1933 at the depression was on everybody's mind and everybody was afraid, so, what does he talk about? fear. >> it's a great speech in the sense he didn't get into policy prescriptions, he wasn't going to say i'm going to do this or i'm going to do that. or i have a 20-point plan. he spent the whole speech talking about the fact we need to get a steely resolve and see it through and talked about fear and said that's the only thing to fear, it's not about the future, we're going to be fine. one of the classics. >> steve: meanwhile, let's take a look at john f. kennedy's inaugural back in the '60s. >> our country and all who serve it, and the globe from that-- and truly like the world and so, my fellow americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)